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May 23

CNNMoney Tech Tumblr: Barnes & Noble pulls every graphic novel exclusive to Kindle Fire →

cnnmoneytech:


From Amazon.com

When Amazon unveiled the Kindle Fire last week, it was announced DC Comics (part of CNN’s parent company Time Warner) would be providing exclusive digital graphic novels and collections to the device — including legendary stories like Watchmen and Sandman.

Well, now Barnes &…

May 23
acehotel:

Seattle is where non-conformist music and independent radio took hold, and that spirit has never been more relevant than it is today. We put down roots there with Ace Hotel Seattle, the first Ace ever, and it will always feel like home. The ashen skies, reams of flyer molting from telephone poles and transcendent coffee are indelibly engraved in the narrative tableau of the formative years of DIY culture.
We’re honored to keep the noise alive with our second year of live broadcasts with Seattle’s own KEXP during CMJ. We’re more thrilled than ever to host three days of bands and DJs from independent labels in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, powered by Toyota’s Free Yr Radio. A stalwart of Seattle’s music history, Art Chantry, presents an archival show of Seattle rock posters, Thanks for the Memories. Art’s poster work for emerging 90’s band influenced several generations of graphic designers and exemplifies the strength and dynamism of Seattle’s music culture.
Art is also creating a poster for the Ace x KEXP broadcasts — screenprinted by DL Screenprinting in Seattle, a print shop specializing in artist print editions and show posters by poster artists like Jermaine Rogers, Emek, Brad Klausen, Justin Hampton, Rob Jones and Gregg Gordon. The limited edition poster will be available exclusively at Ace NYC during the broadcasts.
All sets will be broadcast live over the airwaves in Seattle and everywhere else online and via podcast. Keep an eye out here for real time posts, photos, videos and interviews.

acehotel:

Seattle is where non-conformist music and independent radio took hold, and that spirit has never been more relevant than it is today. We put down roots there with Ace Hotel Seattle, the first Ace ever, and it will always feel like home. The ashen skies, reams of flyer molting from telephone poles and transcendent coffee are indelibly engraved in the narrative tableau of the formative years of DIY culture.

We’re honored to keep the noise alive with our second year of live broadcasts with Seattle’s own KEXP during CMJ. We’re more thrilled than ever to host three days of bands and DJs from independent labels in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York, powered by Toyota’s Free Yr Radio. A stalwart of Seattle’s music history, Art Chantry, presents an archival show of Seattle rock posters, Thanks for the Memories. Art’s poster work for emerging 90’s band influenced several generations of graphic designers and exemplifies the strength and dynamism of Seattle’s music culture.

Art is also creating a poster for the Ace x KEXP broadcasts — screenprinted by DL Screenprinting in Seattle, a print shop specializing in artist print editions and show posters by poster artists like Jermaine Rogers, Emek, Brad Klausen, Justin Hampton, Rob Jones and Gregg Gordon. The limited edition poster will be available exclusively at Ace NYC during the broadcasts.

All sets will be broadcast live over the airwaves in Seattle and everywhere else online and via podcast. Keep an eye out here for real time posts, photos, videos and interviews.

May 23
feltron:

In conjunction with the relaunch of their website, CNN asked me to examine their web statistics and create a visual record of the site’s last 13 years. We were both interested in telling a larger story about the growth of the Internet and the public’s changing media habits through the lens of such an influential and heavily trafficked site.The process started by determining what metrics might hold an interesting narrative, and which ones were available over the entire lifespan of the site. CNN was able to provide me with daily page views, the top 20 days for each year and the most popular pages on those days. I was also provided with monthly category views and lists of the nations visiting the site.The spike chart of average weekly page views forms the centerpiece of the chart. The busiest 10 weeks are called out, and the events associated with the week are highlighted below the x-axis… along with other events of cultural significance or large week-over-week gains. I also tracked the absolute and relative growth of their site categories over time, and highlighted several unique metrics at the top of the chart, including the busiest and slowest days of the year, and the number of countries that visit the site (192 at last count). Finally, to put everything in context, I found milestones in the history of the Internet for each year which I placed along the bottom of the chart to create context for the narrative.Ultimately, I think the most fascinating story here is the change in our news habits after September 11, 2001. After this day, a new and higher baseline for visits to the site is established, and the inference is that this event really established CNN.com and the greater Internet as a reliable, timely and indispensable source for news.

feltron:

In conjunction with the relaunch of their website, CNN asked me to examine their web statistics and create a visual record of the site’s last 13 years. We were both interested in telling a larger story about the growth of the Internet and the public’s changing media habits through the lens of such an influential and heavily trafficked site.

The process started by determining what metrics might hold an interesting narrative, and which ones were available over the entire lifespan of the site. CNN was able to provide me with daily page views, the top 20 days for each year and the most popular pages on those days. I was also provided with monthly category views and lists of the nations visiting the site.

The spike chart of average weekly page views forms the centerpiece of the chart. The busiest 10 weeks are called out, and the events associated with the week are highlighted below the x-axis… along with other events of cultural significance or large week-over-week gains. I also tracked the absolute and relative growth of their site categories over time, and highlighted several unique metrics at the top of the chart, including the busiest and slowest days of the year, and the number of countries that visit the site (192 at last count). Finally, to put everything in context, I found milestones in the history of the Internet for each year which I placed along the bottom of the chart to create context for the narrative.

Ultimately, I think the most fascinating story here is the change in our news habits after September 11, 2001. After this day, a new and higher baseline for visits to the site is established, and the inference is that this event really established CNN.com and the greater Internet as a reliable, timely and indispensable source for news.

May 23
selleckwaterfallsandwich:

Featured Sandwich: Blackened Salmon

selleckwaterfallsandwich:

Featured Sandwich: Blackened Salmon

May 23
fromme-toyou:

Feeling the culture…
Visiting Abu Dhabi in the UAE on behalf of Puma’s Ocean Sailing

fromme-toyou:

Feeling the culture

Visiting Abu Dhabi in the UAE on behalf of Puma’s Ocean Sailing

May 23

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Large droplets ejected from a liquid pool do not coalesce immediately back into the whole.  Instead, a thin layer of air gets trapped beneath them, much like the oil lubricating bearings.  The weight of the droplet causes the air to drain away, and eventually the droplet comes in contact with the pool. Some of the droplet gets drained away before surface tension snaps the interface back into a low energy state. A new smaller droplet then bounces upward before repeating the process over again. Eventually the droplet becomes small enough that its entire mass gets sucked away by the pool. Researchers call this process the coalescence cascade.

May 23
npr:

THIS is NPR.
(Seen today in the 5th floor refrigerator — that’s where NPR Photo, Monkey See and NPR Music sit, FYI).
Photo: Cristina Fletes / NPR

npr:

THIS is NPR.

(Seen today in the 5th floor refrigerator — that’s where NPR Photo, Monkey See and NPR Music sit, FYI).

Photo: Cristina Fletes / NPR